dave’s killer breaded seitan

Dave’s Killer Breaded Seitan, Steamed Kale, BBQ Sauce

This very American dinner was appropriately based around the seitan lite from the American Vegan Cookbook.  Of course, the other star is the pride of the Pacific Northwest: Dave’s Killer Bread.

The baked seitan cutlets were breaded with a mixture of toasted, pulverized Dave’s Killer Good Seed bread, freshly ground black pepper, salt, cayenne pepper, oregano, sesame seeds, nutritional yeast, and sweet paprika. The cutlets were dipped in a water and cornstarch slurry, and then pressed firmly into the mixed crumbs. The cutlets were sprayed with canola oil and baked on parchment paper at 375F for 30 minutes, flipping halfway through and spraying again. They were baked at 425F for an extra 5 minutes for crispy-ness’ sake.

Soon to be breading action

Your dinner is served

steamed kale and blueberries, direct from the new Pioneer Square farmar

I picked up two half pints of blueberries. My berry excitement is about to come to well, fruition this weekend – the first in a series of therapeutic and fulfilling weekend berry picking adventures!

before the surprisingly competitive slashing of prices…

Cashew Basil Cream & Roasted Garlic Stuffed Morels

stuffed morels

Only one thing would have these mushrooms even better – if I had foraged for them! Alas, they’re from the farmers market. That being said, my first real NW foraging adventure is in the works and these were darn affordable for fancy mushrooms that could also be mistaken for elven hats.

The mushrooms were stuffed (via makeshift pastry bag) with a puree of soaked cashews, fresh basil, red miso, black pepper, roasted garlic, lemon juice, and a little water. A flavor combination welcome to return to my life any day.  As for blending, the Magic Bullet blender’s small cup really comes in  handy for pureeing small batches of filling like this.

The glass baking pan was lightly greased, and the stuffed mushrooms were sprinkled with coarse salt before roasting. They were baked for 15 minutes at 400F, carefully flipped, and baked another 10 minutes at 425F.

The finished dish was sprinkled with chopped, fresh basil, because it’s spring!

Just Stuffed:

morels, stuffed

Fresh Morels – briefly soaked in cool water and drained, twice.

morels

French Sel Gris – from the Hawthorne Fred Meyer’s affordable and versatile salt bar

sel gris

For the record, I’m shocked I only just added a tag for roasted garlic. It’s like I don’t even know myself.

Grilled Seitan and Portobello with Pistou

Grilled Seitan and sliced Portobello with Pistou

pistou

I may not have a garden with fresh basil, or a backyard to grill in, but I do have access to numerous, inviting farmers markets and my handy dandy cast iron grilling pan.  I don’t completely forget about it in the winter; the desire to grill simply springs out this time of year.

Pistou sauce is traditionally made with a mortar and pestle. I don’t have one in my life, but I do have blending machines. This post really is all about looking on the bright side and smashing basil.

The seitan is based on the Seitan Cutlets in Veganomicon.  I cooked it as one large uh, dough, and played with the seasonings a bit.  The baking broth included basil, black pepper, and Bill’s Best Chick’nish seasoning.  Both sliced seitan strips and de-gilled portobella mushroom slices were carefully tossed and marinated in 1/2 cup of pistou for 30 minutes prior to grilling.

Basically, pistou is a generous, nutless pesto.  A lot of the recipes online call for fancy cheese, but traditionally, it doesn’t have to.  I stuck with a tablespoon of nooch. Any more, and it would have become cheesy sauce pistou.  Nothing wrong with that, and I believe in pesto mac, but it wasn’t what I was going for with this.  I added the vegetable broth because I didn’t want something incredibly oily, so do what you will.

The Pistou ingredients:

  • 1.5-2 cups fresh basil leaves
  • 1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon vegetable broth, or water
  • 2-3 tablespoons of olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon nutritional yeast
  • 1 clove of garlic (go for 2 if you’re using small cloves)

Directions: Pulse quickly in your blender or food processor.  You’re not looking to completely puree this, you want some specks of herb left.

This makes about 1 cup of sauce.  Use the leftover pistou as a marinade, spoon onto soup, make a sandwich spread mixed with Vegenaise, or do as I did, and top your favorite dishes.

Pistou

Pistou

Plated, over local green leaf lettuce

Pistou

hail something.

Strawberry Season Beckons!

OMG

Pint of organic strawberries from Groundwork Organics at the Shemanski Park Farmers Market.

aka the Wednesday, Downtown FarMar.  I had never realized those SW Park Blocks had a name. Anyway, I brought these back to work and actually shared them  - that’s how sweet they were.  They wanted me to share the good word. Don’t worry, it’s vegan regardless of how they telepathically spoke to me from their fruit membranes.

A summer of strawberry tarts and muffins and smoothies beckons, & perhaps some raw desserts! Truthfully, I’m most excited about them fresh! And picking in a month or so! It’s always so therapeutic - and cost-effective.

oh, rejoice! The Portland Farmers Market is back!

It was undeniably the place to be in Portland this past weekend.

and thanks to the press releases (who doesn’t read press releases about their local farmers markets?), I knew it was going to be bigger & better than ever – doubling in size in the PSU Park Blocks.

I was literally sitting at my desk this morning, daydreaming about the vegetables I have at home.

For such an early start to the season, I was constantly thrilled, booth by booth, to see such variety!  I’ve grown accustomed to walking home from the first market of the season with a bundle of raab or rapini or two, and I did, with a bunch more. I started my farmar adventure with a patiently delivered, cup of single origin Burundi Stumptown from Cafe Velo, nibbled on a trail mix bar from BlackSheep Bakery, explored the new routes, marked purchases for round #2, and ran into happy friends.

Notables:

  • The variety!
  • The hipster mustaches! more than ever! with babies! (I know! It’s Portland, but there were more than usual)!
  • Room to move!
  • Gooey (Daiya?) vegan cheese on deep dish slices at the new Via Chicago Pizza stand!
  • The line for coffee at Cafe Velo is not as scary as it looks!
  • Local Yukons (especially miniature! make me never want to buy another russel potato again).
  • Multi-recycling & composting efforts!
  • Petunia’s Pastries stand!

The Photos:

The market is enormous!

farmar 2010

There is room for 3 different music spots! Maybe more? At least 2 were official.  Sadly, I don’t have a photo of the cool country western singers (with mustaches).

life march 2010 012

The crowd thickens…

life march 2010 015

Broccoli raab sighting #1, check

RAAB

Even more glorious raabs!

life march 2010 021

Bought my garlic here…

farmar 2010

Tempting.

farmar 2010

There are two food strips now – in the middle and the farmost SW corner.
Some vegan highlights -

farmar

I’ve never ordered from here, but it’s nice to know it’s an option.

farmar food

Via Chicago

Chicago pizza Portland Farmers Market

BEHIND THE SCENES

farmar 2010

Glorious.

life march 2010 025

If I hadn’t opted for coffee, hot peppermint tea would have been calling.

life march 2010 026

Preppin’ the mushroom samples

life march 2010 027

support the fraggles

fraggles

My haul: Cremini mushrooms, Yukon Gold potatoes, brussel sprout raab, broccoli raab, mustard greens, asparagus, miner’s lettuce, red Chesnok garlic

farmar haul 3/20/2010

My only reason to get up at 9am on a Saturday that is truly worth it.  I contemplated signing up for a CSA again this year, but the farmar is truly too much fun to resist.

And the first actual dish from my haul, besides nibbling on miner’s lettuce and tossing a piece to my cat:

Shells Con Broccoli Raab, modified from The Urban Vegan (with miso!)

urban vegan pasta

Made with orrechiete and broccoli in the book; whole wheat shells and broccoli raab in my kitchen. Small dish of nooch for sprinklin’. Local greens and garlic.