A New Tradition in the Life: Marsala, Sun-dried Tomato & Mozzarella Stuffed Mushrooms

The Story:

Stuffed mushrooms were one of the first dishes I learned to pull off and share with guests as a vegan. Italian background, Italian food, check. I can still remember my mom pulverizering the filling in the food processor, and that flavor, which was nothing like the other foods I ate (admittedly, it was full of parmesan and likely, crab, and I was such a picky eater). My late mother actually developed a severe, yet comical,  allergic reaction to mushrooms at some point, yet still kept making these due to popular demand. Nowadays, I usually make them for potlucks, and there’s nearly always wine (because mushrooms should nearly always be drunk), nuts, and breadcrumbs involved. Very recently, my mushrooms-have-the-consistency-of-eyeballs paranoia returned, as it is does now and then, so there I was, with creminis, yet, not wanting to slice them. Stuffed mushrooms are the least of my squishy mushroom fears, and there I went. You could easily sub red wine, or add roasted garlic, steamed greens, vegan crab, etc.  Stuffed mushrooms = versatile.

The Recipe:

Marsala, Sun-dried Tomato & Mozzarella Stuffed Mushrooms

Ingredients:

  • 20-25 cremini mushrooms, stems separated, and gills scraped (optional)
  • 2 cloves of minced garlic
  • 1/2 cup dry Marsala wine
  • 1/2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 cup shredded vegan mozzarella (I used Chicago Soy Dairy Teese)
  • 1-2 tablespoons of chopped sun-dried tomatoes (re-hydrated or oil packed)
  • 1/2 cup breadcrumbs (I used Dave Killer’s Good Seed)
    • Note: I used 3/4 cup initially, and had too much filling leftover, hence the cut. Not the end of the world if you run a little short or extra!
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • freshly ground black pepper
  • pinch hot paprika
  • pinch nutritional  yeast
  • additional olive oil for spritzing
  • additional wine

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F and lightly grease a casserole dish large enough to fit the mushrooms, such as an 8×8 or 8×4.
  2. Thoroughly mince the mushroom stems, either with a knife or in a food processor.
  3. Sauté the garlic and mushroom steams over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add the wine, stir for 1 minute, and simmer for an additional 5, or  until most of the liquid evaporates.
  4. Add the herbs (excluding the salt & pepper!) and stir for 1 more minute. Remove from heat.
  5. Mix the breadcrumbs, sun-dried tomatoes, salt, pepper and nutritional well in a bowl. Carefully mix in the sautéed mushrooms mixture and vegan mozzarella shreds, and incorporate well.
  6. Using a 1/2 tablespoon, fill each mushroom cap with the mixture, packing tightly. Place the caps into your lightly greased baking pan, spray with olive oil and a couple good dashes of additional wine, and cook for 20 minutes. If you have extra mushroom caps, just save them to slice into a tofu scramble or something.
  7. Increase the heat to 425F, and cook for an additional 10-15 minutes, as needed. Check for browning.
  8. Remove from oven, briefly yet cool, pour some more wine, and serve.

The Photos:

Filling:

Mixed:

Pre-baked:

Roasted:

The End.

Jalapeno and Herb Roasted Tempeh and Broccoli

This meal brought about the usage of positive profanity. For starters, it was Mexican inspired and didn’t include cilantro.

Jalapeno and Herb Roasted Tempeh and Broccoli. Served with red quinoa, black beans, carrots and fresh tomatoes.

Jalapeno and Herb Roasted Tempeh

Jalapeno and Herb Roasted Tempeh and Broccoli

Adapted from Jalapeño Roast Chicken with Baby Broccoli

Book: Marcela Valladolid’s “Fresh Mexico,” Clarkson Potter, 2009

Makes 4 servings

Frankly, I was googling “jalapeño” and “broccoli” for utilization.

The end result were these hearty, entrée-sized pieces of tempeh immersed in a savoury broth, flavored with the warm spice of jalapeños,  and brightened with fresh basil. Broccoli florets are added to this gathering of green ingredients towards the end of roasting.

Ingredients for Paste:

  • 1 small shallot
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 3-4 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons dried oregano (or handful of fresh)
  • handful fresh basil
  • 1 jalapeno – stemmed and de-seeded
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • generous amount of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon agave
  • 1 teaspoon fresh lime juice
  • pinch nutritional yeast

Ingredients for Broth:

  • 1 cup ‘chicken style’ broth
  • 1/2 cup dry white wine
  • 1-2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1/2 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
  • 1.5 tablespoons fresh lime juice

Additional Ingredients:

  • 16 ounces tempeh, sliced into large triangles (halved if 8 ounce squares, for example)
  • 1 jalapeno, sliced
  • 1 bunch of broccoli, divided. Slice the stalks thinly.

Serving suggestions:

  • fresh, sliced tomatoes
  • fresh torn basil or oregano
  • steamed grains, such as quinoa
  • savoury black beans
  • serve in a burrito or over pasta

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375F
  2. Add all liquids into 9×13 glass casserole dish. Carefully stir the pureed mixture into the large glass baking dish.
  3. Immerse the tempeh triangles into the liquid. Immediately flip over.
  4. Add the sliced jalapeno and bake for 20 minutes.
  5. Increase the heat to 400F. Remove the dish from the oven.
  6. Use a spatula to flip the tempeh pieces over. Add a spoonful of the baking liquid on top of each.
  7. Bake for an additional 15 minutes.
  8. Remove the pan from the oven. Add the broccoli and drizzle with additional baking liquid. If you are low on liquid, add a few tablespoons of additional broth.
  9. Roast an additional 15 minutes.
  10. Remove from oven and serve as desired.

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Khao Soi Yellow Curry Noodles with Tofu

Khao Soi Yellow Curry Noodles with Tofu and assorted vegetables

Adapted from the Thai-Burmese style recipe on Veggie Belly and various others, based on my available ingredients and whim. Inspired by the notion of cauliflower + curry, a field trip in deep SE Portland to the Lents International Farmers Market for produce, great pour over-style Ethiopian Yirgacheffe from Nectar Coffee Co., and onward adventures to Fubonn. I’ve had curry noodles on the brain since dining at In the Bowl in Seattle this past Spring.

Khao Soi Yellow Curry Noodles with Tofu

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon canola oil
  • 1 clove of minced garlic
  • 1/2 cup sliced yellow squash (I did half circles)
  • 1/2 cup sliced carrots
  • 1/4 head of cauliflower, chopped into florets
  • 1/2 cup shredded swiss chard (including stalk)
  • 1 diced jalapeno
  • 1 tablespoon yellow curry paste
  • 1/2 teaspoon Indian curry powder
  • 1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon dark soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon vegetarian fish sauce
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 cup coconut milk or light coconut milk
  • 1 cup water
  • 3-4 oz dried vermicelli rice noodles (use more or less depending on how soupy you want the finished product)
  • 1-1.5 cups of sliced fried or fresh tofu
  • handful of torn fresh basil leaves

Garnish:

  • Chopped basil or cilantro (look, I’m only typing it because it’s traditional in this dish)
  • Lime wedges
  • Sriracha

Instructions:

  1. Sauté the garlic in oil over medium heat for 1-2 minutes.
  2. Stir in the curry powder and paste.
  3. Add all of the vegetables, and cook for 7-10 minutes. Stir frequently; lower the heat if anything starts to burn.
  4. Pour in the coconut milk, sauces, brown sugar, tofu and water. Mix in and bring to a boil.
  5. Lower the  heat, stir in the noodles, incorporate with tongs, cover with a lid and simmer for an additional 5-10 minutes on low.
    • Alternately: Use pre-cooked rice or wheat noodles and add in at this point. Don’t cover the pot if you do this.
  6. Add torn basil or cilantro leaves, incorporate and serve.
  7. Garnish individual portions and add soy sauce, lime and/or hot sauce as desired.

Just pretend that’s cilantro on top…

Vegetables:

From the Lents Farmers Market:

Utilized Sauces, etc:

The small Fubonn haul, which most certainly includes a smoked vegan ham tube. Plans forthcoming. Isn’t Ota’s new package adorable?

Some more from Lents:

I picked up beets and jalapeño peppers at the farm below (currently infusing cayenne and jalapeno tequila at home).

This is my patience. Bell peppers, please!

-

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Adventures with Daiya: Macaroni & Cheese

Vegan or not, who can deny this mac and cheese looks realistic?

I spy melting!

mac

Somewhere out there, a vegan couple is considering giving their newborn the middle name “Daiya”. Somewhere in Portland, I’ve come to accept and appreciate Daiya more than ever before.

The latest test? Adventuring into Macaroni & Cheese territory.

Vegan-traditionally, I prefer my noodles coated with a homemade nutritional yeast sauce started with a roux.  I’ve been on a roller coaster ride of Daiya experiences this past year, and I’ve been holding out for a real winner. With that, these Shells & Cheese with Daiya are now in the lead.

This vegan version is based on an adaptation from Serious Eats of Martha Stewart’s Macaroni and Cheese from The Martha Stewart Living Cookbook: The Original Classics.

Macaroni and Cheese with Daiya 101

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 tablespoons Earth Balance
  • 4 cups unsweetened nondairy milk
  • ½ cup flour (I used chickpea)
  • 1 clove grated or minced garlic
  • 1 heaping teaspoon coarse salt
  • generous pinch of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/8th teaspoon of freshly ground nutmeg
  • Pinch cayenne pepper
  • 2 cups of Cheddar Daiya (1 package)
  • ½ cup nutritional yeast
  • 1 pound of pasta, such as shells, cooked al dente.
  • ¼-1/2 cup breadcrumbs
  • Optional: 2 tablespoons additional vegan cheese (homemade or packaged), or tahini
  • Optional: 1 tablespoon miso

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Lightly grease a 9×13 casserole dish.
  2. Melt the margarine over medium heat in a large sauce pan. Add the garlic and stir frequently, cooking an additional 1-2 minutes. Quickly whisk in the flour.
  3. Stir in the milk and cook until thickened, 8-10 minutes. Whisk frequently.
  4. Remove the sauce pan from heat and stir in the spices, salt, pepper, Daiya, nutritional yeast, and any additional ingredients.
  5. Carefully pour the cooked macaroni into the cheese sauce. Mix well with a wooden spoon or spatula.
  6. Even more carefully, pour the mixture into the casserole dish. Cover with breadcrumbs, as desired.
  7. Bake until golden brown on top, about 30 minutes.
  8. Optional: broil an additional 3-5 minutes for a crispier top layer.
  9. Let cool just a bit, and serve. And eat.

Consider: Adding chopped green vegetables to the last few minutes of pasta cooking, and consequently, into your mac.

Serves: A lot! I would recommend halving the recipe if you’re feeding 1-2 and don’t want leftovers for days.

Saucin’ and whiskin’

sauce

The melt: Daiya’s super duper melt remains revolutionary and the most impressive (and therefore, grossest?) on the market. I like to picture of a team of Susie-esque mad vegan scientists hard at work in Canada furthering their developments, and occasionally taking a snack break with Tings.

The taste: As my friend Maeve has so elegantly stated, it’s like Velveeta went vegan. Say what you will.

The verdict: I wouldn’t make this again. Using shredded Daiya felt like cheating, and I just don’t love the taste. Appreciate, sure. Like enough, maybe. However, it was fun adventure, and my mind was boggled at how the Daiya melted and stretched and sauced!

Shells and Cheese with Daiya 101

mac

¡Papas Guisadas!

Confession: I had no idea what these were called until I brought home a $1 grab bag of peeled potatoes and bell peppers from Limbo and decided I had to recreate the spicy potatoes Los Gorditos usually serves buffet style at their events.

Living on the same street as both freakin’ Gorditos, I think this shows a lot of reserve, and proper budgeting! After a few minutes that seemed like hours googling ‘stewed spicy potatoes’ on my stupid blackberry, I went to work. Many hours later, I returned home and did the following:

¡Papas Guisadas!

  • Ingredients:
    • 5 large, peeled potatoes, diced into large chunks (I used russets – use whatever kind you want, just watch for softness when boiling)
    • 1 bell pepper, preferably brightly colored , sliced into thin strips
    • 2 jalapeno or serrano peppers, roughly chopped
    • 2-3 cloves of garlic, minced
    • generous pinch of onion powder, or if you’re not me, 1/2 yellow onion
    • 1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved (note: I used fresh cherry tomatoes because I had them, most recipes online call for canned tomatoes, which will make it more stew-y)
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • generous dash of freshly ground black pepper
    • water for boiling
  • Directions:
  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil and add the potatoes.  Cook for 10-20 minutes, checking for semi-softness.
  2. While potatoes start to cook, warm the oil in a medium-sized pot on medium heat.
  3. Add the garlic, onion element, and hot pepper. Stir frequently and cook for 2 minutes, lower the heat if you need to. If you’re using a real onion, cook for an additional few minutes.
  4. Add the bell pepper strips and tomatoes and stir frequently for another minute.
  5. Once the potatoes are done, drain and to pan. Mix well and add salt and pepper to taste.
  6. Serve!
  7. Optional: As opposed to sauteeing with more oil, if you want this somewhat crispy (and I always do), bake in the oven on parchment paper or a ceramic baking dish at 425F for 15 minutes.

Serving Suggestions: Serve alongside some Mexican style soy curls and greens!  Last night, I assembled baked corn tortilla tacos with the Papas Guisadas, spinach, spiced up cheezy sauce and spicy pinto beans, and they ruled.

Cashew Basil Cream & Roasted Garlic Stuffed Morels

stuffed morels

Only one thing would have these mushrooms even better – if I had foraged for them! Alas, they’re from the farmers market. That being said, my first real NW foraging adventure is in the works and these were darn affordable for fancy mushrooms that could also be mistaken for elven hats.

The mushrooms were stuffed (via makeshift pastry bag) with a puree of soaked cashews, fresh basil, red miso, black pepper, roasted garlic, lemon juice, and a little water. A flavor combination welcome to return to my life any day.  As for blending, the Magic Bullet blender’s small cup really comes in  handy for pureeing small batches of filling like this.

The glass baking pan was lightly greased, and the stuffed mushrooms were sprinkled with coarse salt before roasting. They were baked for 15 minutes at 400F, carefully flipped, and baked another 10 minutes at 425F.

The finished dish was sprinkled with chopped, fresh basil, because it’s spring!

Just Stuffed:

morels, stuffed

Fresh Morels – briefly soaked in cool water and drained, twice.

morels

French Sel Gris – from the Hawthorne Fred Meyer’s affordable and versatile salt bar

sel gris

For the record, I’m shocked I only just added a tag for roasted garlic. It’s like I don’t even know myself.

Mr. Paik’s Favorite Grilled Seitan Bulgogi

After his daughter surreptitiously purchased a controlling interest in Paik Heavy Industries, Woo-Jung Paik’s stress levels were a scary sight. Not as scary as the blank look in Sayid’s eyes these days, but enough that he finally listened to his doctor (Dr. Mittlesomething?) about lowering his semi-worrisome cholesterol.  Which brings us to his personal chef’s Grilled Seitan Bulgogi.

grilled bulgogi seitan

Served with white rice and steamed broccoli raab, sprinkled with sesame seeds.

steamed broccoli raab and white rice

Let’s pretend I snuck into the Paik mansion’s kitchen and stole this guide for a cholesterol-free vegan version of Korean Bulgogi Beef.

The homemade seitan was thinly sliced and marinated overnight in a sauce of soy sauce, sherry, sesame oil, dark agave, sugar, minced garlic, grated ginger, green onions, rice vinegar, tons of freshly ground black peppers, and liquid.  I used leftover seitan broth to impart more flavor.  I composed the sauce based on my own taste – please adjust to your own liking.

Bulgogi Sauce:

  • 3 tablespoons of soy sauce
  • 1 tablespoon sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons of sherry
  • 2 tablespoons dark agave
  • 1 tablespoon sugar (or all 3 sugar)
  • 2 green onions, chopped (I skimped on this)
  • 2-3 cloves of minced garlic
  • 1 tablespoon of grated ginger
  • very generous pinch  of freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup broth or water

Whisk together. Marinate for multiple hours.

The strips were cooked on a stove top grill pan, and basted with additional sauce after the first flip.  They were kept warm in a baking dish with leftover sauce.

This was served with white rice, steamed broccoli raab, and Sriracha

Mr. Cluck’s Outback Roaster Tofu

Hugo Reyes Approved!

(I wish.  But I do figure him for the open minded type - Jorge, the actor, has given love to Sweet & Sara marshmallows on his blog!)

Mr. Cluck’s Outback Roaster Tofu, served with grilled asparagus, since it’s in season in Australia*.

Outback Glazed Tofu

Up to date on LOST?  In case you freakishly haven’t seen this yet, check out the Mr. Cluck’s commercial from Comic Con 2009, featuring Mr. Cluck’s Outback Roaster Chicken, the inspiration for this meal.  As soon as I saw the commercial (just last week, what THE HELL WAS WRONG WITH ME?!?), I knew I wanted to make a vegan version, for fun.  To literally feed my obsession.

I assure you, fellow LOST fans reading this, that it pains me that I didn’t have more time to serve with a side of mashed potatoes, corn, and diced pineapple on top.  I’m leaving for vacation tonight! Alas!

Anyway, here’s what I made:

Mr. Cluck’s Outback Roaster Tofu or Seitan, a Veganized, Copycat, Obsessed Recipe

Ingredients:

  • One pound block of drained, sliced tofu, or large slices of seitan.
  • 1 cup of beer (preferably not pale; I used Session Black lager – yes, it’s vegan!)
  • 1.5 tablespoons agave nectar
  • 1.5 tablespoons tamari or soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 clove of garlic, sliced
  • 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • extremely generous pinch of freshly ground pepper
  • pinch of sea salt or seasoned salt
  • 1 teaspoon grated lemon peel

Directions:

  • Whisk all ingredients together, being careful not to make a mess with beer foam, unless you want to.
  • Marinate the tofu and/or seitan for a few hours, preferably overnight.  Now, I grilled mine on a cast iron grill pan because I don’t have fancy grilling instruments for that oven roasting effect the commercial alludes to.
  • I misted my grill pan with oil, turned to medium heat, opened my window, and grilled on both sides 4-5 minutes for those dark lines.
  • I splashed with more sauce 3 minutes in, on each side.
  • Serve with vegetables, sprinkled with more pepper, a slice of lemon, and enjoy!
  • Smile and think of winning the lottery with sheer luck.

Seitan variation:

I tried out a seitan and tofu variation, both marinated overnight in a sweet, seasoned beer-based sauce.  My friend Maeve, the girl who still swoons over Boone, voted tofu.  I originally figured seitan would hope up better against the sauce, since it’s more chicken-on-the-barbie type.  I think Boone would probably agree with Maeve.

Sauce
Sauce.

Mr. Cluck’s Likes Tofu!!

Image Credit: The Hatch on Zazzle

*not a fact

Yellow Curry & Butternut Squash Hummus (or Sweet Potato)

Imagine if President Obama were vegan! He would look like this….

Political Hummus Creation and Image Credit: Sabra Hummus and Kirk Rademaker

Actually, I simply don’t have an accompanying photo for this recipe, and I googled “hummus monster” and the hummus John McCain turned up, and I went from there.

Onto the dip!

I first made this Yellow Curry &  Squash Hummus on a whim for a I LOVE 2002! party last month.  I was already making Smoked Paprika Hummus from The Urban Vegan, had more chickpeas, and beans dips are easy, inexpensive party food. You can go classic, or you can go creative.  My brain went…..remember a week or two ago when you made Yellow Curry Squash soup?  Let’s work with those flavors and add chickpeas!  You’re out of tahini anyway so use you have to use peanut butter.  And it happened.

I decided to make it again and play with the recipe for the refreshments table at my presentation on Local & Vegan Eating at the library recently because a) it’s fairly creative b) party food for a crowd! and c) hummus is SO vegan.  I easily subbed mashed sweet potato for the squash on round #2, since I had it on hand.

Yellow Curry & Butternut Squash (or Sweet Potato) Hummus

(aka what would happen if you pureed yellow curry with chickpeas)

Serves: Many!

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of rinsed chickpeas (canned or cooked)
  • 1/2 peanut butter OR 1/4 cup tahini + 1/4 cup peanuts
  • 1.5 cups roasted sweet squash (or sweet potato – roasted or canned)
  • 2 heaping teaspoons yellow curry paste (I use local Thai & True brand, also available from Food Fight! online)
  • 5 cloves of garlic
  • 1/2 tablespoon – 1 tablespoon ginger (if you like more, use more)
  • 1-2 teaspoons of Sambal Oelek or other heat source (crushed red pepper, hot sauce, etc.)
  • 1/4 water or coconut milk
  • 1/4 cup tamari (you can obviously sub soy sauce, but this keeps it gluten free)
  • 3 tablespoons peanut oil
  • juice of one lemon
  • 1 teaspoon agave or brown sugar
  • pinch of dried basil, or a few leaves of fresh basil
  • optional: 2 tablespoons flaked coconut (especially if you’re not using the coconut milk)
  • generous pinch of freshly ground pepper
  • dash paprika
  • Dipping instruments, such as pita bread, tortilla chips or crudites

Directions:

  1. Puree oil, chickpeas, peanut butter or tahini and peanuts, and garlic in a food processor or blender, until smooth.  Use a spatula to wipe down the sides a couple times.
  2. Add everything else, blend well!
  3. Transfer to serving bowl and garnish.

Garnish: Toasted sesame seeds, diced fresh basil

Garnish, if you’re not me: sliced green onions, cilantro

Remnants:
after: the food table

And one more thing - Crossant with chocolate chips from Back to Eden Bakery & Boutique =

Out of this World, Vegan Awesome.

chickpeas are cheap: an outpouring of thoughts about the garbanzo and dried beans.

Roasted Chickpeas with Nutritional Yeast, Oregano and Sea Salt

As usual, my history with using dried beans is linked to the Post Punk Kitchen.  I remember a blog post years ago, challenging people to soak their own beans and base meals around the outcome.  When I finally had the balls to soak my own, I was thrilled x 40 at the results, and most importantly, how far it stretched my initial, mere investment. It’s so resourceful, healthy and cost-effective!

There are definitely occasions I’m short on time or stockpiling a bit for an apocalypse, and I’ve yet to make the move for a pressure cooker, but a simple colander, large pot and time are all I need to bring beans to life in my kitchen. FYI, they’ve never spoke to me.

Quick & obvious notes on using dried beans:

  1. Buy dried beans in bulk. In Portland, you can go to co-ops, farmers markets, New Seasons, Fred Meyer, and I think even Safeway has a bulk area.  You can buy dried beans in bags  at most stores, of course, but it’s more fun and economical to buy them by the pound.
  2. Pick out any really noticeable crud. I just give my beans a quick look over, and toss a couple times.
  3. Soak them during the day, 4-8 hours, while you’re out working or counting leaves (clearly the only two things I think people do during the day).
  4. Rinse in a colander (one the beans won’t fall through).
  5. Cook according to bean specifications. There’s a guide halfway down this page, and one in Veganomicon, which I’m sure you own. I normally don’ t need more than 1.5 hours for chickpeas.  I usually just cook in water, but you can always play with broth with herbs and alliums.

I spent this past Friday night wildly cooking chickpeas and prepping for the next day’s event.  FYI, I store my cooked beans in pitchers, and change the water every couple days.

Over the course of the weekend, the chickpeas went into Yellow Curry & Sweet Potato hummus, 40 Cloves Chickpea & Broccoli, and Chickpea Cutlets.  I try and save money, bringing lunch to work, as boring as it can be.  I’m sure I’ll do much more  with these little pieces of protein over the next week or so, and extra will go bagged into my freezer!

Ten Chickpea-y Ideas:

  1. Chickpea Cutlets from Veganomicon. I always bake these, and I’ve been known to mold them into ball-form as well to serve with marinara. There are gluten-free versions floating around the internet.  I’ve had ones my friend Michelle has made, they’re really good!
  2. Roasted Chickpeas. This was the first way I ever cooked chickpeas, back in college, when I spent a lot of time playing around on Vegweb.com.  Dreena Burton’s Tamari Roasted Chickpeas is an easy way to start if you’ve never made them before.
  3. Chickpea Quinoa Pilaf - again, from Veganomicon! Really versatile. Quinoa + Chickpeas = nutrition!
  4. One word: Falafel
  5. Pasta: There are recipes for this on every cooking website that exists. Lightly saute in extra virgin olive oil with minced garlic, crushed red pepper, and spinach, and serve over pasta with sea salt, fresh pepper and nutritional yeast to your liking.
  6. Add to Bowls: ala Joanna’s Almighty Bowl style post or Blossoming Lotus
  7. Another one word: Hummus. I wouldn’t be surprised if there are entire cults based around this dip. I’m going to post the recipe for the Yellow Curry inspired hummus this week.
  8. Gravy: I’ve actually never made the famous Punkrock Chickpea in Vegan with a Vengeance, but I have made a Silky Chickpea Gravy in testing for Isa’s new low-fat book.
  9. Chana Masala: The Indian Classic. I love when this is in the lunch special at Bombay Chaat House!
  10. Add to Soups: add to any soup that calls for beans, or you’d think would work in. Who makes vegetable soup without beans?  huh? Years ago, I tried and liked this recipe for Chickpea Garlic Soup from The Angelica Home Kitchen.

Runner Up: Chickpea salads. These aren’t really my thing, but I have caught myself with no time and lack of ingredients, snacking on chickpeas + nooch + sea salt…

Fun fact: There are white, green and black chickpeas.

Wow, that was so About.com of me.

Chickpea-usage, the photos!

40 Cloves Chickpea & Garlic - a tester for Isa’s new book (second time I’ve made it!)

Chickpea Cutlets - I made these in my food processor, but they’re super easy to make without it.

Chickpea Cutlets

Chickpea Cutlet Balls

Tamari Roasted Chickpeas from Eat, Drink & Be Vegan

Chickpeas in a really colorful Tofu Scramble

Baked Tofu and Chickpea Quinoa Pilaf

Chickpea Pitcher

chickpea pitcher

I wish my photo did this more justice, clearly I was in a rush to dine.

Chickpeas added to Pasta e Faglio, from The Urban Vegan

Comforty, Lower-Fat New Farm Mac & Cheeze, Gluten Free, and thickened with Chickpea Flour

Chickpeas Romesco from Veganomicon

Baked Falafel from Vegan with a Vengeance

And a plate of fresh vegetables, with store bought pita and stellar hummus from Barbur World Foods. For the record, their fresh baked pita is one of the best things in the world. Lunch@work.

P.S.

Thanks to anyone reading this who came to the presentation at the library this past weekend!  There was a huge turn out, which delighted both the library staff and myself! I had a blast talking about a topic I adore – Local & Vegan Eating in Portland, OR.  Totally makes me want to visit the People’s Farmers Market this week! I just love the Portland vegan community.